К содержанию

Анатолий
Анатольевич
Eфремов

Card 36 - Reading

Раздел 2 (задания по Чтению)

9 Прочитайте тексты и установите соответствие между текстами и их заголовками: к каждому тексту, обозначенному буквами А-G, подберите соответствующий заголовок, обозначенный цифрами 1-8. Используйте каждую цифру только один раз. В задании есть один лишний заголовок.
1. Alaska in the past5. Winter sporting activities
2. Hopes seldom come true6. The deal of the century
3. Close neighbours7. Back to nature
4. A mistaken opinion8. Popular tourist routes
A Alaska and Russia are less than 3 miles apart at their closest point in the Bering Strait. In winter, it is possible to walk across the ice from one country to the other. Alaskan and Russian natives on either side of the Bering Strait carry on active border trade and visit each other. Nowadays the University of Alaska has more Russian students than any other university in the United States.
B The name of the largest American state comes from the Aleut language for ‘great land’. Native American people - Inuits, Yupik Inuits and Aleuts - have lived in Alaska for thousands of years. Life in Alaska has always been difficult, but they learned to adapt to the harsh climate. They lived by hunting seals, whales and bears and by fishing. They used sledge pulled by dogs to travel over the snow-covered land, and lived in igloos - houses made of snow.
C The territory of Alaska was purchased from the Russians for $7.2 million (very cheaply). Alaska was considered to be a frozen wasteland and nobody could imagine that it would turn out to be one of the United States' richest resources for gold and oil. For many years the Americans called the buying of Alaska ‘Seward's Folly’, after Secretary of State William H. Seward, who arranged the purchase in 1867
D Most tourists expect to find the Alaskans still living in igloos and leading an isolated life on the snowy plain. To their surprise, the Alaskans’ daily life does not differ much from life in the central parts of the country. Most Alaskans live in modern homes, drive cars, watch TV, and shop in modern stores. Alaska’s communities have restaurants, theatres, museums, and modern health care facilities. The real life in Alaska is much less exotic than it is described in books and films.
E The discovery of gold in 1896 started a huge Gold Rush that brought thousands of people to Alaska. All the adventurers wanted to make a fortune, but many died of cold and hunger on their way to the gold-field. And very few of those who survived managed to find the gold. The famous writer Jack London tried his chance in Alaska too, and many of his books were influenced by his personal experience.
F The small Alaskan town of Gustavus is an interesting community. The town's 400 citizens are a mix of professional people - doctors, lawyers, former government workers and artists. For various reasons they decided to drop out of the stressful city life and live on their own in the middle of the woods. Electricity only arrived in the early 1980s and in some homes they still get water from a pump and make a fire to heat water to wash in.
G Iditarod, one of Alaska’s most famous events, takes place in early March. It is the 1,100-mile sled dog race from Anchorage, the capital of Alaska, to Nome, a city on the coast of the Bering Sea. The race is very popular and the winners and their teams of dogs become local celebrities. Downhill and cross-country skiing as well as skijoring (when skiers are pulled by one or two dogs) are very popular in Alaska too.

Запишите в таблицу выбранные цифры под соответствующими буквами

Текст A B C D E F G
Место действия

1BAB84

Прочитайте текст. Определите, какие из приведённых утверждений 10-17 соответствуют содержанию текста (1 - True), какие не соответствуют (2 - False) и о чём в тексте не сказано, то есть на основании текста нельзя дать ни положительного, ни отрицательного ответа (3 - Not stated). В поле ответа запишите одну цифру, которая соответствует номеру правильного ответа.
David Livingstone

David Livingstone was an explorer, missionary, and anti-slavery fighter. He became a great hero of the 19th century for his discoveries in Africa.

David Livingstone was born in 1813 in Scotland, and grew up with several brothers and sisters in a single room in a gloomy building for the workers of a cotton factory. To support his family, he started working at the cotton mill as a child. The work was dull and monotonous, but it taught him patience and sympathy with those who worked hard. Though he had twelve-hour working days, David studied at school during the evenings and weekends. Later, he started studying medicine in Glasgow and completed his medical studies in 1840 in London.

In the official role of a ‘medical missionary’, he set off for Africa, arriving in Cape Town, South Africa, in 1841.

Exploring Africa, Livingstone went north and walked across the Kalahari Desert. He came upon Lake Ngami and, later, the Zambezi River. Livingstone was the first European to see the famous Zambezi falls, which he renamed Victoria Falls, after Queen Victoria.

Livingstone was the first medical missionary to enter southern and central Africa, and he was the first European to meet local tribes. He won their trust as a friendly person and an experienced doctor. He had so many patients among the native people that he had to limit his treatment only to those with serious illnesses.

David Livingstone made two more expeditions to Africa. By 1856, he was one of the first Europeans to cross the African continent from west to east. His motto, which was later written on the base of the statue to him at Victoria Falls, was ‘Christianity, Commerce and Civilization.’ He deeply believed that the navigation of the Zambezi River, as a commercial route into the centre of the continent, would help people achieve these goals. Livingstone also tried to find the source of the Nile River. He never did, but discovered lots of facts about the four great African lakes.

Livingstone’s African expeditions brought him fame as one of the leading explorers of the 19th century. However, according to historians, one of Livingstone's greatest achievements was also promoting antislavery ideas. His books told people about the cruelties and horrors slaves had to suffer.

For several years there were no letters from Livingstone and it was decided in London that the explorer was lost. The two main British newspapers sent the journalist, Henry Stanley, to Africa to find David Livingstone. Stanley found the explorer in late 1871, and upon seeing him, said the now well-known words, "Dr. Livingstone, I presume?"

Livingstone refused to leave his beloved Africa and spent the last years of his life almost cut off from the outside world. He died in 1873. Later, his body was transported to London and buried in Westminster Abbey.
10 All David Livingstone’s sisters and brothers started working in their childhood.
  • 1) True
  • 2) False
  • 3) Not stated
Ответ:
11 In his childhood David Livingstone never attended school.
  • 1) True
  • 2) False
  • 3) Not stated
Ответ:
12 David Livingstone named one of the natural wonders after the British Queen.
  • 1) True
  • 2) False
  • 3) Not stated
Ответ:
13 During his expeditions, David Livingstone treated the local people.
  • 1) True
  • 2) False
  • 3) Not stated
Ответ:
14 David Livingstone went to Africa several times.
  • 1) True
  • 2) False
  • 3) Not stated
Ответ:
15 David Livingstone bought slaves and made them free.
  • 1) True
  • 2) False
  • 3) Not stated
Ответ:
16 Henry Stanley made David Livingstone return to England.
  • 1) True
  • 2) False
  • 3) Not stated
Ответ:
17 David Livingstone’s grave is in Africa.
  • 1) True
  • 2) False
  • 3) Not stated
Ответ:

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